Welcome to my inner wonderland!
Reblogged from thewritingcafe  267 notes
Obviously the first draft is never the best work, but how many drafts should you allow yourself to go through before you stop editing?
Anonymous

thewritingcafe:

There’s no set number because everyone is different. Some people only go through three drafts and others go through ten or more. Here is a general description of the drafts that you should go through:

  • First draft: This is the roughest of the rough. Make all the mistakes you want. After finishing this, take a break from your story for a while. You’ll come back with a fresher mind. The waiting period is up to you. 
  • First Rewrite: The second draft is when you rewrite the whole thing. If you didn’t have an outline before, it might be a good idea to make one now to keep track of everything.
  • Other Rewrites: Some people need to rewrite the whole story more than once. Always take a break between rewrites. If you do continuous writing, you’ll get sick of your story and your imagination will fall. Work on some other stories between drafts.
  • Major Revisions: Once you’re at the point where you don’t think you need to rewrite the whole thing, start making other major revisions. This includes rewriting individual scenes, pages, or paragraphs, changes to characters, and changes to plots. This might take a while.
  • Minor Revisions: You’re pretty close to finishing when you get to this stage, but you’ve probably got some minor things you want to change. This would include dialogue, minor descriptions, names, appearances, word choice, etc. Look for cliche phrases, excess adverbs, wordy sentences, and inconsistencies in plot or character here. This step can also be combined with major revisions.
  • Editing: This is when you look over every line to make sure everything is spelled right, to make sure your punctuation and grammar are correct, to make sure you formatted the manuscript correctly, and to make sure everything is consistent.

Here are some other tips for revision and editing:

  • Save each draft as a separate file.
  • Keep a checklist of things to do when you get into the more precise editing.
  • If you use Microsoft Word or Google Docs to write, take advantage of the comments feature to write notes for yourself when rewriting or editing.
  • Always take a break between each draft. You will have more energy and more motivation if you make yourself wait. You need a fresh perspective.
  • Work backwards on some drafts. Most of us start out strong at the beginning and end up with flat endings because we’re drained of energy and we just want to finish writing or editing. Other times, start at the middle.
Reblogged from queen-of-terrasen  665,013 notes

justablueumbrella:

A writer for the new york times interviewed a series of people who had survived jumping off the golden gate bridge. Every person she interviewed admitted that about two thirds of the way down, they realized that every seemingly meaningless problem that caused them to jump was fixable.

Every single one.

THIS IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT

Reblogged from thewritingcafe  22,400 notes

How It’s Said (substitutes)
In a happy way: laughed, rejoiced, giggled, joked, lilted, sang out.
In a sad way: cried, agonised, bawled, blubbered, lamented, sobbed, groaned, snivelled, wept, mourned.
In a bossy way: insisted, bossed, demanded, preached, dictated, professed, ordered.
In an angry way: raged, miffed, seethed, fumed, retorted, thundered, blurted.
In a pained way: barked, cried out, cried, screamed, jabbered, bellowed, groaned, howled, shrieked, roared, grieved, wailed, yelped.
In a frightened way: quaked, stammered, shuddered, quivered, trembled.
In an understanding way: empathised, accepted, consoled, crooned, comforted, sympathised, agreed.
In a tired way: mumbled, struggled, emitted, wearied.
In a begging way: beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded, entreated, appealed to.
In a mocking way: mocked, ridiculed, derided, hooted, japed, insulted, jeered, parodied, taunted, teased, chaffed, flouted, degraded, sneered, disdained, jibed, gibed, disparaged, belittled, decried, flouted, fleered, leered, scoffed, sniggered, swiped, scorned, repudiated, lampooned.
In a seductive way: purred, simpered, coaxed, wheedled, persuaded, baited.
As an answer: As an answer: responded, retorted, replied, rejoined, answered, acknowledged.
[Source] [[Jack Teagle]

How It’s Said (substitutes)

In a happy way: laughed, rejoiced, giggled, joked, lilted, sang out.

In a sad way: cried, agonised, bawled, blubbered, lamented, sobbed, groaned, snivelled, wept, mourned.

In a bossy way: insisted, bossed, demanded, preached, dictated, professed, ordered.

In an angry way: raged, miffed, seethed, fumed, retorted, thundered, blurted.

In a pained way: barked, cried out, cried, screamed, jabbered, bellowed, groaned, howled, shrieked, roared, grieved, wailed, yelped.

In a frightened way: quaked, stammered, shuddered, quivered, trembled.

In an understanding way: empathised, accepted, consoled, crooned, comforted, sympathised, agreed.

In a tired way: mumbled, struggled, emitted, wearied.

In a begging way: beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded, entreated, appealed to.

In a mocking way: mocked, ridiculed, derided, hooted, japed, insulted, jeered, parodied, taunted, teased, chaffed, flouted, degraded, sneered, disdained, jibed, gibed, disparaged, belittled, decried, flouted, fleered, leered, scoffed, sniggered, swiped, scorned, repudiated, lampooned.

In a seductive way: purred, simpered, coaxed, wheedled, persuaded, baited.

As an answer: As an answer: responded, retorted, replied, rejoined, answered, acknowledged.

[Source] [[Jack Teagle]